Films on Demand

97% Owned

Year
2012
Duration
140 minutes

When money drives almost all activity on the planet, it's essential that we understand it. Yet simple questions often get overlooked, questions like; where does money come from? Who creates it? Who decides how it gets used? And what does this mean for the millions of ordinary people who suffer when the monetary, and financial system, breaks down?

97% owned present serious research and verifiable evidence on our economic and financial system. This is the first documentary to tackle this issue from a UK-perspective and explains the inner workings of Central Banks and the Money creation process.

Produced by Queuepolitely and featuring Ben Dyson of Positive Money, Josh Ryan-Collins of The New Economics Foundation, Ann Pettifor, the "HBOS Whistleblower" Paul Moore, Simon Dixon of Bank to the Future and Nick Dearden from the Jubliee Debt Campaign.

A Fighting Chance

Year
2007
Duration
30 minutes
Location
Australia

Once a celebrity and Olympic champion in his former homeland of Bosnia, 42-year-old Nermin Sabanovic thinks he still has what it takes to fight for a world boxing title. While he may have the support of the Bosnian community and his friends at the Aboriginal Sobriety Group where he works, his wife and two daughters aren’t so sure. Nermin has been out of the ring for ten years and his aging body may not be up to it.

A Hard Rain

Year
2007
Duration
77 minutes

This is a documentary that had to be made! Twice Academy award nominee and five times AFI winner David Bradbury’s latest contribution, A Hard Rain, explores the ‘other side’ of the nuclear debate.

Governments and most mainstream media are promoting that nuclear is now an attractive alternative to fossil fuels – the magic fix that will save us all from global warming. Nuclear power has taken on a clean and green spin from the low point 20 years ago which saw the Chernobyl meltdown.

Traversing five countries – China, France, UK, Japan and Australia, and using what Bradbury learnt from his previous three nuclear documentaries (Public Enemy Number One, Jabiluka and Blowin' in the Wind), A Hard Rain takes a closer look at the global nuclear industry in its entirety – from the mining of uranium through to the nuclear power plant to the radioactive waste and weapons manufacturing. It exposes the hidden agendas behind this latest push for Australia to go nuclear.

Included are interviews with some of the world's top scientists and environmentalists on the subject such as Dr Rosalie Bertell from Canada, Dr Chris Busby from the UK, and from Australia, Dr Mark Diesendorf (Ex CSIRO) from the Environmental Institute at the University of NSW, Prof. Ian Lowe, President of the Australian Conservation Foundation, and Dr Gavin Mudd from the Monash University Engineering Department.

Interviews with traditional owners who have been locked out of genuine consultation with what is happening on their country is also included in this film.

By looking at the experience of countries overseas that have gone nuclear, A Hard Rain debunks some of the myths of the nuclear industry: that nuclear is safe, cheap, health and green with little chance of another Chernobyl happening.

If you want vital and factual information to debate the issue intelligently and overthrow the myths that the nuclear and pro uranium mining lobby has so successfully implanted in the media, in the government and the Labor Party, then this documentary is a must see.

Aftermath: The Remnants of War

Year
2001
Duration
72 minutes

AFTERMATH is a feature-lenghth documentary which takes us to Bosnia, France, Russia and Vietnam to meet a series of unique people. A Frenchman picks up unexploded bombs from the First World War; a Russian tries to identify bones from the Second World War; a Vietnamese struggles with the lingering effects of Agent Orange from the Vietnam War; and Bosnians live in an environment studded with mine-fields. Their stories flow from one to the next, providing portraits of man's inhumanity to man but also our ability to heal old wounds. With a mix of never before seen footage, stock images, narration and original score, AFTERMATH is a reminder that we will continue to pay for the last century's legacy of war for years to come, and that future generations will pay for contemporary events which are occurring even now. Aftermath is based on the Lionel Gelber Prize winning book by American author Donovan Webster. Directed by Daniel Sekulich.

America's Darkest Secrets

Year
2012
Duration
35 minutes

America's Dark Secrets Documentary takes a look at some of the most infamous extremists, radical & cult groups in American history.  We also highlight the recent case involving the allege Black Hebrews crimes in Durham, North Carolina. What were the ties to top-secret government agencies; mass murders, suicides, illegal drug experimentation and the abundance of racial injustice? Who profits off of such groups? Are these extremists victims of urban terrorism, culprits or simply both?

 

This documentary focuses on three main stories linked to a covert human experimentation program called MK Ultra created in 1953.  ??First, we look at the 1974 kidnapping by the Symbionese Liberation Army of a world famous newspaper heiress' daughter named Patty Hearst in Berkeley, California.  Its leader was ?Donald "Cinque" Defreeze, an African - American male & ex-convict.  ??Next, is the biggest single loss of life prior to 9/11 led by cult leader Jim Jones.  The charismatic preacher led a crusade of mostly minorities from San Francisco, California in 1979 to the jungles of Guyana, South America. One determined U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan wanted to put a stop to Jones & aggressively pursue top-secret government involvement.  Ryan was investigating & threatening to leak information to the government on the Jones & Patty Hearst cases.  He was assassinated in the line of duty on an airstrip in Guyana, along with several news journalists.  ??The 3rd segment is the May 13, 1985 bombing of a radical group called "Move", who protested against police brutality in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The bomb killed six African - American adults and five children.  Nine members of the Move group were prosecuted & convicted of killing a white police officer by a former Pennsylvania governor.  ??200 children in Jonestown, 5 in Philadelphia and a recent one murdered & buried in North Carolina; we all fall short but go a little too far when harming defenseless "kids".  If we don't know our past, how can we adequately be prepared for the future?

Another Life

Year
2011
Duration
80 minutes

Every year, hundreds of thousands of Africans risk their lives trying to get into Europe. This is their story. We follow a convoy of young migrants. First came the hopes and idealism of the journey’s start. They were going to be the lucky ones who overcome all the odds to build a new life in Europe. Next came the growing comprehension of just what they had undertaken. The loss of their money in bribes to corrupt officials. The dried-out bodies of other migrants in the desert - a constant reminder of what would happen to them if they ran out of water. Then came the hell of Libya’s internment camps. The squalid conditions and beatings. And finally, the bitter knowledge that they are simply pawns, to be used and abused by every authority they encounter. And the sickening realisation that they have lost the biggest gamble of their lives. DIRECTOR: ALEXANDRE DEREIMS.

Arc of Fire

Year
2008
Duration
52 minutes

They call it ‘Arc of Fire’. It’s the biggest operation against illegal logging in Brazil’s history. And its mission is to save the Amazon. Since April 2008, Federal Police, National Security Force Agents and the Environmental Protection Agency have been conducting joint operations against the timber mafia. It’s been dubbed the first ecological war of the 21st century. Hundreds of armed policemen scour the Amazon by helicopter, looking for signs of illegal deforestation. Already, they’ve imposed millions of Euros in fines, dismantled illegal sawmills and razed thousands of charcoal ovens to the ground. But locals, who rely on the lumber industry, claim Operation Arc of Fire is driving them to destitution. Director: Alexander Bouchet.

Being with Clay

Year
2011
Duration
81 minutes
Location
Canada

Her first documentary, "Youku", is an example of Ms. Hongyu's intellectual and spiritual depth. She uses an oral history approach to tell a simple but profound story about 85 year old Yang Bailiang's life history. Ms. Hongyu's documentary beautifully sculptures Yang Bailiang visually whose hands and face are remarkable, while revealing the potter's simple peasant life, a constant struggle to survive using pottery making skills to barter for food, learned from her great, great, great grandmother; a heritage dating back to the Neolithic age, 6000 years ago, among the Li Minority of Hainan Island. The documentary is a kind of visual poetry with a strong filmic sense that gives the viewer a taste of how ancient history translates to surviving in the 21st century. There is also a lovely sense of humor. Winner: Heritage Award, 8th Montpellier Film Festival of Clay and Glass (March, 2012) . Director Tan Hongyu

Bimblebox

Year
2012
Duration
73 minutes
Director
Michael C O'Connell
Location
Australia

The Bimblebox Nature Refuge lies in the path of what will be the earths largest coal mines. One woman, Paola Cassoni, decides to resist the "China First" project that will destroy her Nature Refuge and supply energy to Asia for the next thirty years. Paola's decision brings the viewer on a tour of Australia's "Quarry Vision".

At this critical time, when so much coal and coal seam gas expansion is planned in Australia, this film aims to win the hearts and minds of the people, exposing the destructiveness of this industry to our climate, communities and environment. It tells the stories of the people fighting for their homes and culture. Australia is the worlds largest exporter of coal supplying one third of the worlds supply. It is impossible to address climate change without looking at Australia's role in the planets climate future.

The film features many prominent members of the debate against coal expansion in Australia including Guy Pearce (Global Change Institute), Ove Hoegh-Guldberg (University of Queensland) and Matthew Wright (Beyond Zero Emissions).

Not just a "coal is bad" film. Bimblebox features solutions from Beyond Zero Emissions and their vision of Australia as the Saudi Arabia of renewables, instead of the Saudi Arabia of coal. They offer a captivating, verifiable, alternative.

Bimblebox is artfully made film by Michael C O'Connell and features the music of Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu. The film features landscapes that would be destroyed if the mining expansions go ahead and provides a first-hand glimpse of the growing protest movement against the expansions.

BLACK DIAMOND: FOOL’S GOLD

Year
2010
Duration
52 minutes

It’s an old story with a perverse new twist. Before, it was known as the transatlantic slave trade. Today, it’s just called business.
This is the compelling story of the international web of speculation and trafficking in African boys, under the guise of international football.
Every African boy dreams of being scouted for a Western club. Football means a way out of poverty for their entire families: a passport to a new life. But most of the boys are simply pawns in a cynical game governed by self-interest and money. Tricked out of thousands of euros, they end up abandoned in foreign countries. We travel from the slums of Accra and Abidjan to the petro-dollar sports temples of Arab potentates and unravel the networks ensnaring these African boys. Directed by Pascale Lamche.

Blast 'Em: A Celebrity Stakeout!

Year
1992
Duration
103 minutes

BLAST 'EM offers a comical, bold and disrespectful view of the world of paperazzi and their famous prey. They steal up on and photograph their subjects, sometimes with their consent, usually without. The main character of this film is Victor Malafronte, a young professional photographer from New York, who is well-known as the most aggressive and talented of the new generation of 'photography-killers'. He and his pals take the viewer on a 'ride on the wild side', hunting for Madonna (jogging), Michael J. Fox (also jogging), John F. Kennedy jr., Willem Dafoe, Robert De Niro, Sigourney Weaver, and others (who are doing things celebrities do). Besides images of these photographers who are trying to sell their pictures to the highest bidder, the film explores the seemingly endless obsession of the audience with the rich and famous. BLAST 'EM forces us to ponder on popular-cultural values that we find self-evident. Directed by Joseph Blasioli, Egidio Coccimiglio.

Blowin' in the Wind

Year
2008
Duration
60 minutes
Location
Australia

Blowin' in the Wind examines the secret treaty that allows the US military to train and test its weaponry on Australian soil. It looks at the impact of recycled uranium weapons and the far-reaching physical and moral effects on every Australian. The film's release has been timely as the government currently moves to approve more uranium mines while arguing the contrary - that by going nuclear we are being both 'safe' and 'green'. Blowin' In The Wind reveals that Iraqi babies are now being born with major birth defects. Bradbury wonders whether Australians living downwind from the military testing ranges will be next. He argues that we were lied to by the British over the Woomera and Maralinga atomic tests. Can we trust another equally powerful partner in our 'war on terror'? With a cash budget of just $12,000 Blowin' In The Wind raises pertinent questions which cannot be ignored by the Australian public. The film shocked, angered and surprised large audiences when shown at the Sydney and Brisbane Film Festivals.

Director's Statement (David Bradbury)

This is a film that very much wanted to find me. I tried to fend it off, exhausted from making environmental and political films on shoestring budgets that told hard truths to my fellow Australians that they needed to hear but preferred to ignore. In today's climate of self censorship, and public broadcasters who fear that their political masters in Canberra will still further cut their budgets if they support these sorts of films, fellow filmmaker Peter Scott and I pushed on regardless. With a hard cash budget of $12,000 and a beg, borrow or make do philosophy...and a lot of favours, we've pulled together this doco I know you'll never see on 'your ABC'. The picture it paints and the consequences for us all if we don't raise our protest loud and long to this new military alliance with the United States is too devastating to ignore.

The Paddy McGuinness's, the Gerard Henderson's and Greg Sheridan's of this world with their sycophantic attitudes towards their media masters and ruling class elite will have a field day in attempting to put this film down, to write it off as 'propaganda', typical anti-American sentiment with no substance. It's time for all of us to draw a line in the sand, to acknowledge whether we are in fact happy to be the 51st state of America.

More than ever, it's time for us all to stand up and be counted for the decency and genuine moral values of what I believed as a kid it meant to be 'a fair dinkum' Australian. Not a false, jingoistic patriotism that is built on fear, that justifies war crimes in the name of the so-called War on Terror. Rather, I embrace a healthy nationalism that acknowledges who we are as Australians with compassion for the underdog and giving everyone a fair go. In a humble but sincere way, I hope this film made with a lot of heart and commitment can play a small but important role in galvanizing a lot of us to do just that.

Bulaq

Year
2011
Duration
26 minutes
Location
Egypt

On 25th January thousands of Egyptians gathered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, sparking what we call now the Egyptian Revolution. Only a few hundred meters far from the world-famous square, the people from popular neighbourhood Bulaq joined protesters, finding in demonstrations something more than a glimmer of hope. Through their voices, ‘Bulaq’ portrays their collective struggle against eviction and social marginalisation, whose destiny seems to be strictly intertwined with the hesitant fortunes of the Egyptian spring.

Collective Moments of Madness

Year
2008
Duration
95 minutes
Location
India

Five international travelers (3 French, 1 British and 1 Australian) set out on an epic journey, to be the first people to take Bactrian camels from the towering heights of the Himalayas down to Rajasthan and the famous Pushkar camel fair. When two of the camels die, the travelers are blamed for the deaths their camels, in the local media and the BBC. Threatened with charges of animal cruelty, police prosecution and mob justice, the group is forced into hiding.

Colour by Numbers; The Sudokumentary

Year
2010
Duration
48 minutes
Location
Australia,India

In a highly specialized, highly intellectual competition, one team of unqualified, under-prepared individuals prepare to make their mark! Australia first national sudoku team (the Numbats) travel into the unknown of competitive puzzling as they enter the World Sudoku Championships in Goa, India.

Competing against numerical geniuses from the world over, including the much fancied tournament favourite, Thomas Snyder, the Numbats experience what representing their country is all about.

Daisy Bitch

Year
2006
Duration
40 minutes
Location
Israel

"Daisy Bitch" is the stage name of a young Israeli drag queen named Eli Abergel. The film documents Eli's life for two years, enters his personal world behind the costumes and make-up, and turns into a psychological journey which reveals his unique and complex relationship with his conservative Jewish mother, Jacqueline. Coming to terms with her son's strange lifestyle leads to a turning point in their lives. A huge gap exist between Eli's two worlds: on the one hand, the world of the homo-lesbian community in Tel Aviv and on the other, living as an IDF solider in a low socio-economic, conservative family from a suburban proletarian town. The conflict that emerges from within this impossible combination reaches its climax at the end of the film.

Desert Riders

Year
2011
Duration
52 minutes

Thousands of children, some as young as two, were trafficked to work as camel jockeys in the Middle East. At the training schools, they were starved, injected with hormones and physically abused. Many died. Even more never returned. Even though the use of children as camel jockeys has now been banned, many suspect the practice is still continuing. We hear the stories of the children whose lives have been marred forever by their experiences. DIRECTOR: VIC SARIN/ PRODUCER: filmblanc.

Discovering Lake Argyle

Year
2011
Duration
60 minutes
Location
Australia

When explorer Alexander Forrest discovered the rich black soil plains surrounding the mighty Ord River during his 1879 exploration of the north west of Western Australia, he set in motion a series of events that began with the pioneering Durack family driving 7000 head of cattle all the way from Queensland and has culminated today in the amazing Ord River Scheme.

During peak flood in the wet season, enough water flows out of the Ord River in a single hour to supply Perth for 10 years. Today this water is harnessed by the spectacular Lake Argyle, Australia’s largest body of fresh water at currently over 27 times the size of Sydney Harbour.

The lake is the centre piece in the Ord River Scheme, which is one of the most ambitious infrastructure projects in Australia’s history.

The film features:

> The Pioneering Durack Family
No story of the history of the East Kimberley can be told without including the Durack Family who over several generations have played a pivotal role in the development of the region.

> The Diversion Dam & Ord Dam Construction
Both dam constructions were captured on 16mm film at the time and offer us an insight into Australian life in the late 1950's to early 1970's.

> The Ord River Scheme Development
With the dams built and the dream of unlimited water now realised, the next challenge was to find crops that would thrive in a tropical environment.

> The spectacular Ord River & Lake Argyle
In Discovering Lake Argyle we show you the lake and the river from the air in plane and helicopter and from the water by high speed tour boat, 12 foot tinny and even canoe.

Doni doni - soon you will be artists.

Year
2012
Duration
54 minutes
Location
Guinea

In Koumana village Bangali, Moussa, Dati and Omori Camara are learning the traditional music of Hamanah people: the Strong Men, by master Nankhoria Amadou Keita.

Step by step they will learn the secrets of Hamanah tradition. Yakhouba Dabo, a young percussionist from Conakry, reaches Koumana during his travel in search of traditional rhythms where he meets the four children. Their destinies meeting is the cross between village and city, where tradition and modernity weaves together.

Finding Joseph Tusiani: The Poet of Two Lands

Year
2011
Duration
84 minutes

This is the story of a journey, discovering both poetry and life of a man through the meeting of two generations: the biographer Daiana, interpreted by Daiana Giorgi, and the poet and writer Joseph Tusiani. Special guest international journalist Furio Colombo. Joseph Tusiani, born in Italy and emigrated in the US in 1947, is a recognized exceptional and international classicist and contemporary poet and lives in New York City. Professor Emeritus at New York University, and former vice-president of the American Association of Poetry he has been the first American to win the prestigious Greenwood Prize (London) on top of many other awards.

Generation OS13: The new culture of resistance

Year
2012
Duration
28 minutes

Generation OS13 is an explosive insight into the attack on civil liberties occurring in western democracies and how artists, musicians, journalists and authors encourage the peoples right to resist against Banker occupation.

Featuring Painter, poet & song writer Billy Childish, Harry Malt from Bare Bones, Luke Turner from The Quietus, journalist Huw Nesbitt, broadcaster Max Kaiser, author Nicholas Shaxson & Artists Anika, Comanechi, Gaggles & Saul Williams.

Gore Vidal – The United States of Amnesia

Year
2014
Duration
90 mins minutes
Director
Nicholas Wrathall

No twentieth-century figure has had a more profound effect on the worlds of literature, film, politics, historical debate, and the culture wars than Gore Vidal. Anchored by intimate one-on-one interviews with the man himself, this is a fascinating and wholly entertaining portrait of the last lion of the age of American liberalism. Commentary by those who knew him best—including filmmaker/nephew Burr Steers and the late Christopher Hitchens—blends with footage from Vidal’s legendary on-air career to remind us why he will forever stand as one of the most brilliant and fearless critics of our time. This is Gore Vidal’s last word and testimony, written and directed by filmmaker Nicholas Wrathall. Featuring interviews with Tim Robbins, Mikhail Gorbachev, Sting, David Mamet and Dick Cavett.

Growing Change

Year
2011
Duration
60 minutes
Location
Venezuela

Growing Change is a documentary that looks at one of the most exciting experiments in the world to grow a fair and sustainable food system.

In Venezuela, from fishing villages to cacao plantations to urban gardens, a growing social movement is showing what's possible when communities, not corporations, start to take control of food.

I just love to Paddle

Year
2011
Duration
30 minutes

In July 2008, Napoleon and five paddling companions attempted to cross nine Hawaiian channels in six days, each in a one-man outrigger canoe.

I Told You I was Ill

Year
2005
Duration
60 minutes
Location
United Kingdom

I TOLD YOU I WAS ILL: THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF SPIKE MILLIGAN is an intimate and deeply personal portrait of comic genius Spike Milligan through the eyes of his brother, three daughters and third wife. Each saw a very different side of this complex and multifaceted man who forever changed English comedy and trampled on the notions of decorum and deference. For the first time his family have opened up their personal archives to reveal Spike as a brilliant, tortured and visionary man who trod the thin line between genius and debilitating depression.

I'm a Stripper, So What?

Year
2013
Duration
31 minutes
Location
Australia

In these days, the stereotyped image of all strippers as drugs addicts, whores and brainless ‘bimbos’ is over...These new-age strippers break the mould - they are multi graduates, law students or successful businesswomen. Through interviews and filmed scenes of their bared bodies, the film explores the lives of these strippers. Not only have these exotic dancers overcome personal hurdles, they have to deal with the daily scrutiny of their profession as well as fighting for their safety. Some girls are constantly faced with the possibility of meeting someone they know or being recognized by parents, boyfriends or colleagues. Both riveting and insightful, this half an hour documentary delves into the fascinating world of adult entertainment.

In the Boondocks

Year
2011
Duration
58 minutes

This poetic documentary film links the fate of New York artist Jimmy Ernst and his parents Max Ernst and Louise Straus on several narrative levels with the story of the print shop Augustin in Gluechstadt.

1935 - Jimmy's parents had to flee to Paris - the Augustin family take in the 15-year-old as an apprentice typesetter. He learns how to set foreign languages such as Chinese and Arabic as well as Runic characters and cuneiform script. Inspired by his work he develops a fascination with symbols that will influence his entire oeuvre. With the help of the Augustin family Jimmy finally manages to escape to New York in 1938. His father later follows him to the United States, his mother is deported to Auschwitz where she is murdered.

The print shop Augustin today: based on photographs and contemporary witness accounts the abandoned print shop comes back to life. While the camera sweeps over characters, mysterious symbols and foreign alphabets, the images are accompanied by text passages from Jimmy Ernst's memoirs "A Not-So-Still Life", read by Burghart Klaussner to the music of sound artist Ulrike Haage. In its entirety this provides a fascinating insight which is crowned by pictures taken by the renowned photographer Candida Hoefer. Directed by Artur Dieckhoff & Christian Bau. Note: the above trailer is in German but the full film is narrated in English.

Jabiluka

Year
1997
Duration
63 minutes

The struggle of the Mirrar Aboriginal people against the Jabiluka uranium mine, in the Northern Territory.... Jabiluka is about us, blackfellas, whitefellas together... and our belief in the future of our nation...

Currently Energy Resources of Australia (ERA) is pushing to open a new uranium mine that is surrounded by the World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park. The traditional Aboriginal owners have told the company and the government that they do not want this mine. They are concerned about its effects on their country and culture. Environment groups and many others are also working to stop Jabiluka and other new uranium mines.

Many Australians are asking how can we threaten the cultural and environmental values of our most famous world heritage listed national park... Kakadu? How can we put at risk the culture and the lives of the indigenous people of Kakadu with a new uranium mine at Jabiluka?

The Federal Government of Australia, the government of the Northern Territory, mining company Energy Resources of Australia (ERA) and the Northern Land Council all want uranium mining to go ahead at Jabiluka... but the Mirrar people are saying 'No'.

Since the Ranger mine at Jabiru was given approval in 1978 Mirrar opposition to the proposed Jabiluka mine has strengthened... 19 years on. Living and social conditions amongst Kakadu's indigenous population have worsened and the people are deeply concerned about the impact of mining on their lives and the unknown consequences of storing crushed and pulverised radioactive wastes on their land.

In the culture of the Mirrar. Jabiluka is so sacred not even traditional owner Yvonne Margarula can speak about it. And yet knowing this the Federal Environment Minister Robert Hill has given the green light to the Jabiluka mine... despite the negative findings of a Social Impact Study and warnings from his own departmental bureaucrats that the mining company's Environmental Impact Statement was deficient in key areas.

Jabiluka is the first of 26 proposed new uranium mines the Howard Government has before it for approval. In this important new film twice Academy Award nominated director David Bradbury captures the controversy over Jabiluka.

The Jabiluka mine will be underground, below the flood plain in an area infamous for it's big wet season... and beside Kakadu's famous wetland. ERA plans to clear a mine site and bulldoze a road 22.5 kilometres long to truck the ore to the Ranger mine where it will be processed into yellowcake and then exported.

ERA's Philip Shirvington (CEO sees management of the mine as a simple matter a job they do well: 'We don't add any radioactivity to what's already there naturally.' he says. But 'not so' say the traditional owners, scientists and environmentalists... who are concerned that the tailings will remain radioactive for the next 250.000 years.

The film Jabiluka clearly shows how the Mirrar were given no choice over the Ranger mine, how they were caught in a misleading process to consent to a lease over Jabiluka... and how today they are resisting those same pressures to allow mining to proceed.

The story of Jabiluka is also significant because it raises questions about the real value of 'Land Rights'... the Mirrar people now own their land but are wondering whether that actually means anything. On December 16 as part of her steadfast campaign Yvonne Margarula will take her case to the Federal Court of Australia to prevent the Federal Government granting ERA approval to export uranium from Jabiluka.

She must continue the fight first taken up by her father Toby Gangale... for the right of her people to live in harmony with 40,000 years of cultural tradition. "We know we own the country" she says. "We know. We born the country, and we live the country. It is our country... black country... not white country."

In 1978 Professor Manning Clark visited the 'Top End' and was left with an enduring impression of its abundant cultural treasures, of its pristine wetlands and majestic escarpments. Following that visit he stated clearly his opposition to mining Kakadu.

"It would be an evil day in the history of this country if the white man once again showed the black man that nothing else mattered except material grandeur.

Is it too much to hope that the natural paradise of Kakadu National Park might be a setting not so much for a human paradise but at least a place where the white man and the black man can at last live in harmony with each other?"

Kristina Olsen with Peter Grayling Live in Concert

Year
2004
Duration
182 minutes
Location
Australia

A chance to experience an unusual musical pairing when American singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist Kristina Olsen with Australian cellist Peter Grayling.?Kristina Olsen is a powerfully engaging performer with a blues raw velvet voice, brilliant guitar skills (on acoustic and steel-body slide guitar) and a fine way of crafting a song, from hilarious tales of love-gone-wrong to seriously compelling songs of rare insight and compassion.?

Cellist Peter Grayling takes an instrument rarely seen off the classical stage and weaves it through Olsen's songs, enriching the ballads with a gorgeous, mellow sound and driving along the bluesy numbers with punchy playing and recklessly passionate solos.

?Dr. Grayling was formerly the principal cellist with the Tasmania Symphony Orchestra and now currently does contract work for the Western Australian Symphony when he isn't on tour with Olsen.?These two multi-instrumentalists create inspired musical settings, recorded live with the emphasis on the real interplay of a musical partnership honed on stage.

Lanterna Magicka

Year
2001
Duration
61 minutes
Location
United Kingdom

An insightful look into the life and work of Bill Douglas. Besides being an accomplished filmmaker [one of his classics being "Comrades"], he became keenly interested in early optical devices that predated but complimented the early development of cinema techniques. They mirror and anticipate the creation of the slide and film projectors and the early contributions of people like the Lumiere Brothers. Over a period of thirty years, Bill Douglas discovered and collected pre-cinema optical devices including Magic Lanterns, Thaumatropes, Praxinoscopes, Zoetropes, and Phenakistoscopes; little mechanical wonders dating back to the 19th century that attracted general audiences by evoking a sense of magic stimulating the public's sensibilities and imagination. Taken together, the story of these remarkable but under-appreciated visual contraptions form what the documentary suggests: A secret history of film. Directors Sean Martin & Louise Milne. Writers Sean Martin & Louise Milne. Producers Sean Martin & Louise Milne. Cinematography Sean Martin. Editing Louise Milne, Nick Soldan. Sound Nick Soldan. Visual Effects Peter Gerard. Additional Photography Nick Gibbon, Yorgos Karagiannakis. Production Assistant Nicholas Mark Harding.

Living in a Minefield

Year
2007
Duration
56 minutes

Cambodia is one of the most heavily landmined countries in the world. In many rural areas, virtually all the fields and forest are full of mines. After her husband was killed, An Vi and her eight daughters were left with no choice but to risk their lives cultivating a mine-infested plot of land. “I just dig very shallow and don’t dare to hack,” Vi explains. “If there are deep mines then maybe we won’t reach them”. This is their story. Directed by Marit Gjertsen.

Losing Layla

Year
2001
Duration
60 minutes

Vanessa is nearing forty and decides she wants to have a baby. Her boyfriend Michael isn't enthusiastic about it, but he agrees to help conceive a child. After some time, Vanessa is elated to find herself pregnant and excitedly awaits the baby's birth. After a difficult labor, the baby is delivered by Caesarean and found to have breathing problems. Eight hours after birth, the baby, named Layla, dies and Vanessa and Michael mourn her loss and try to celebrate her brief life

Malaki – Scent of an Angel

Year
2011
Duration
80 minutes
Location
Lebanon

Revolves around families of abducted persons during and in the aftermath of the Lebanese war.It sheds the light on the trauma of six different families constantly teetering on the brink of incertitude.Each family doesn't know the fate of their abducted member whether dead or alive.The premise of the film is humane for it depicts the broken emotional ties within the family away from any political implication.The film combines real interviews within a surreal set on one hand,and surreal fiction on the other hand.Interviews reveal the families reaction towards the abduction of a member.Fiction part is an incarnation of their fantasies,an awaited day of reunion,a recurring dream and a fantasy. The film plays on the notion of blurred reality and fantasies since the families reality is unbearable; ultimately, they escape to their dream.

Director
Khalil Dreifus Zaarour

Executive Producer
May Abi Raad

Original Music
Nadim Mishlawi

Director of Photography
Elie Berbary

Editors
Marwan Ziadeh, Rabih Osta

Assistant Director
Elyssa Ayoub

Sound Mixing
Rana Eid

Miss South Pacific

Year
2010
Duration
39 minutes
Location
Fiji

What does a beauty pageant in Suva, Fiji have to do with climate change? Quite a lot, as it turns out. 'Miss South Pacific: Beauty and the Sea' is a short documentary film about the 2009-2010 Miss South Pacific Pageant that brought contestants, or Queens, to Suva, Fiji to address issues of rising sea levels, and the salt water intrusion that is destroying their land, crops, and drinking water, and in some cases has resulted in the relocation of entire villages from their native homes. Is it too late to turn back the tide? Watch Miss South Pacific and find out what these beautiful and intelligent women are saying about the issues.

Murge: The Cold War Front

Year
2011
Duration
52 minutes

For 13 days in 1962, the world was on the brink of nuclear war. Krushchev’s decision to place nuclear weapons in Cuba sparked the Cuban Missile Crisis. But what’s relatively unknown is that he was responding to an earlier perceived threat from America: the stationing of nuclear weapons in Murge, Italy - within striking distance of the USSR. We reveal how Murge was transformed unwittingly into a theatre of the Cold War.

Our Generation

Year
2011
Duration
60 minutes

Australia's image to the world often features the didgeridoo and Aboriginal art. The country prides itself on its Aboriginal culture and heritage.

But what is its real relationship with the Aboriginal people living today?

This powerful documentary explores the hidden scandal of Indigenous relations in Australia, and the Australian Aboriginal struggle for their land, culture and freedom. Featuring the stories of the remote Yolngu tribe of Northeast Arnhem Land, one of the last strongholds of traditional Aboriginal culture in Australia, as well as the voices of national indigenous leaders, historians and human rights advocates, the film explores the ongoing clash of cultures that is threatening to wipe out the oldest continuing culture in the world.

Australia's Aborigines have some of the worst health statistics and living conditions of any Indigenous group in the world, even though they live in one of its richest countries. Despite the government’s National Apology to the Aborigines in 2008, paternalism and assimilation continue to wreak havoc on their lives. Current government policies, whilst claiming to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, are further disempowering Aboriginal communities and separating them from their lands, culture and languages. The United Nations has repeatedly condemned the government for racial discrimination. But Aboriginal lands contain a large proportion of Australia’s precious natural resources, including uranium, which the government and mining corporations are determined to exploit. The "Children of the Sunrise" are fighting for freedom. This is their untold story, and their message stick to the world.

Perspectives

Year
2011
Duration
58 minutes
Location
Germany,Netherlands,Japan,Switzerland

Perspectives is a documentary about the famous Dutch designer and architect Wiel Arets (1956).
He tells and shows his work, his ideas about architecture and desgin, about infrastructure and big and large cities.
We see him in Japan (Tokyo), Italy (Milan/Alessi), Switzerland (Zurich/Vitra), Germany (Berlin University) and the Netherlands (at home).

Public Enemy Number One

Year
1981
Duration
60 minutes

For most of his working life, controversial Australian journalist Wilfred Burchett chose to report from the "other side". His unorthodox views and activities caused him to be labelled a traitor by many. Burchett was the first Western journalist to report on the devastating after effects of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. He believed that the West was wrong to intervene in Korea. During the Vietnam war he lived among the Viet Cong, and was a friend and admirer of Ho Chi Minh. "I write this as a warning to the world." So began the story filed at Hiroshima in August 1945 by Wilfred Burchett, the first Western journalist to witness the devastation of nuclear war. While 250 journalists were reporting on the Japanese surrender, Burchett alone realized the real story was in that doomed city, officially off limits to outsiders. World War ll was the last war that Australian Wilfred Burchett was to report from his countrymen's side. It was his firm conviction that the West was wrong in Korea, and wrong later in Vietnam, and the stories he filed outraged the West. His long-standing friendship with Ho Chi Minh, the leader of North Vietnam, enabled him to live among the Vietcong. Public Enemy Number One includes footage from the Vietnamese archives rarely seen in the West. Was Burchett a traitor as his detractors claim? There are no easy answers. Burchett insists he was exercising his journalistic responsibility in reporting the truth. The West, he felt, was getting only a distorted view of the conflict. His critics, however, felt he was abetting the enemy and even brainwashing allied prisoners. The Australian Government denied him a passport for 17 years, forcing him to live in exile. In tracing Burckett's life and the wars he covered, Public Enemy Number One raises many issues of vital importance. Can a democracy tolerate opinions it considers subversive to its national interest? How far can freedom of the press be extended in wartime? A gripping part of the film occurs when filmmaker Bradbury was ambushed with Burchett by Cambodian guerillas on a mountain road. In the tradition of photojournalism, Bradbury's camera kept rolling, recording the bloody scene. Burchett escaped injury but can not escape the irony that confronted him in Cambodia. The Pol Pot regime which he had championed had turned Cambodia into a killing ground worse than Hiroshima. Had his loyalties been misplaced after all?

"Public Enemy Number One has special value as a portrait of a maverick. The film should really be called Public Servant Number One. Wilfred Burchett shows great moral courage resisting pressures to conform. Journalism needs such independent spirits." - Gordon Hitchens, film journalist

Chris Statuette, Columbus Film Festival, 1981

Flaherty Film Seminar, 1981

Edinburgh International Film Festival, 1981

Golden Gate Award, San Francisco Film Festival, 1981

Blue Ribbon, American Film Festival, 1981

Second Place, Baltimore International Film Festival, 1981

Best Film, Sydney Film Festival, 1981

Berlin Film Festival, 1981

Return To Gaza

Year
2010
Duration
53 minutes
Location
Palestinian Territory, Israel, Egypt, Australia

‘Return To Gaza’ is a personal insight into the Middle East Conflict through the eyes of a Palestinian Australian, born on a refugee camp in Jordan, who wants to return to Gaza with his family.

This 53 minute documentary covers the difficult journey of Fetah Sabawi, a successful Melbourne musician whose dreams of peace takes him from Australia to Gaza through Egypt, Israel & the West Bank. With his wife, Ola and their two children, Sabawi plans to move to Gaza to head-up a project, funded by UN, to teach music to children. A new life for a rock star going into a war zone. Sabawi’s amazing journey coincides with the first Palestinian elections since the beginning of Gaza and the West Bank’s occupation and the subsequent election of Hamas.

In this film, we discover with our protagonist the Israeli invasion of Gaza and the response from the West. His journey and fate are punctuated by the dramatic events of the Middle East and the involvement of world’s leaders as we see statements from Palestinian President Abbas, US Vice President Biden and US Secretary of State Clinton. Including interviews with the former Ambassador to Egypt, Monzer Eldajani, the elected Hamas member Dr Yusuf al-Shrafi, the acclaimed Australian author Antony Loewenstein and Israeli Peace activists, the film provides a revealing insight into the political minefield of the Palestinian – Israeli conflict and it’s effect on their daily lives amongst the huge walls, check-points and constant military presence.

‘Return to Gaza’ is a poignant story and personal discovery, of a determined westerner and artist facing unbearable issues and losing hope to live one day in Peace in his ancestral home in Gaza.

Sally's Story

Year
2011
Duration
21 minutes
Location
Australia

Self-proclaimed bi-sexual transgender Jewish cowgirl Sally Goldner tells her story of self- discovery, as she navigates the gender path on the way to her 45th birthday. A coming of age tale and personal portrait of inspiring Melbourne transgendered woman Sally Goldner: activist, drummer, singer/songwriter, stand-up comic and radio DJ.

Secrecy

Year
2008
Duration
80 minutes

In a single recent year the U.S. classified about five times the number of pages added to the Library of Congress. We live in a world where the production of secret knowledge dwarfs the production of open knowledge. Depending on whom you ask, government secrecy is either the key to victory in our struggle against terrorism, or our Achilles heel. But is so much secrecy a bad thing?
Secrecy saves: counter-terrorist intelligence officers recall with fury how a newspaper article describing National Security Agency abilities directly led to the loss of information that could have avoided the terrorist killing of 241 soldiers in Beirut late in October 1983.
Secrecy corrupts. From extraordinary rendition to warrant-less wiretaps and Abu Ghraib, we have learned that, under the veil of classification, even our leaders can give in to dangerous impulses.
This film is about the vast, invisible world of government secrecy. By focusing on classified secrets, the government's ability to put information out of sight if it would harm national security, Secrecy explores the tensions between our safety as a nation, and our ability to function as a democracy.

Since I was Born

Year
2013
Duration
54 minutes
Location
Palestinian Territory

Tamer is 11 and has grown up in the only home he knows–the Palestinian refugee camp behind the Israeli security wall. Life is oppressive and the people here have been boxed in for over two generations. Tamer's father Nader was a resistance fighter who tries to protect his son from the horrors of the war and the dangers in the settlement camp. Like all children there he dreams of liberating his country, and to travel to the sea to be free. The Meditarrean Sea is only 40 kms away but virtually impossible for Palestinans to reach without security permits. Nader tries again and again over many years to take his son to see the ocean, and in this tender and revealing documentary the plight of the Palestinians themselves is embodied in the hopes and dreams of young Tamer, and the disillusionment and scarring of his father Nader. Poignant, lyrical and cinematic, this film will move and delight you.

Sons of the Land

Year
2012
Duration
82 minutes

Between 400 and 800 French farmers commit suicide every year. In 1999, the father of director Edouard Bergeon became one of them. Decades later, Bergeon returns to his roots in Southwest France to follow the Itards, a family of farmers, for 14 months. Their story provides a microcosm of the crisis engulfing farmers across Europe today. While telling their story, Bergoen tells his own. Directed by Edouard Bergeon.

Squeezed Like Lemons: Italy in Crisis

Year
2013
Duration
52 minutes

The economic crisis and consequences of the strict austerity policies have hit the Italian people hard. Tax offices are being occupied while business people are taking their own lives in despair. We document the current mood in Italy from the point of view of those whose existence is threatened by this crisis. Giorgia Frasacco, 33, is determined to save her family’s company from bankruptcy after her father killed himself. In her spare time, she runs a support group for the families of business people who, like her father, committed suicide in the last months. Franca Stefani, 37, has been unemployed for over a year and is trying to raise her six year old daughter on 250€ a month while Piero Lospi, 47, recently lost his job. He struggles to adapt to this new reality and feels he has lost his dignity, social recognition and the sense of having a useful role in society. Finally, Gian Luca Brambilla, 50, runs a consulting business specialising in cutting costs in big companies. His problem is not getting work but being paid and his clients owe him almost an entire year’s turnover. We follow our protagonists for several month, interweaving their stories.

Tehrir: The Good, the Bad, the Politicians

Year
2011
Duration
47 minutes

When Egyptians woke up on January 25th, 2011, they never expected the one day demonstration planned for that public holiday to evolve into a full out revolution aimed at overthrowing the regime’s 30 year long grip on power. Three talented young directors decided to tell their story of the revolution from their unique cinematic point of view, choosing to focus not only on the politics, but on a handful of individuals whose actions would determine their fate and forever change the future of their country. This is the story of their revolution told from their eyes with three different perspectives.

We're not likely to get a docu on the 2011 Egyptian revolution with greater scope than "Tahrir 2011," at least not in the immediate aftermath of those momentous events. Cleverly divided into three parts, each helmed by a rising director of what's sure to become known as the bridge generation between pre- and post-revolution, the docu covers the demonstrators in Tahrir Square (directed by Tamer Ezzat), explores the psyche of the police who violently intervened (Ayten Amin), and investigates Hosni Mubarak's psyche (Amr Salama). Egyptian and international markets will enthusiastically applaud, the latter mostly via fests and TV.

The Assange Agenda

Year
2014
Duration
52 minutes
Director
Michael Weatherhead
Location
Australia

Julian AssangeAssange claims that online surveillance is causing a crisis of democracy and a serious threat to civil rights and, as a result, we need greater control of agencies that spy on us. How real is this? What do the experts say? Through WikiLeaks, he has said that not all national secrets need to be kept from us and some are outright scandals that we should know about. NSA leaks by Edward Snowden confirm what many have suspected. Governments are now collecting our private conversations on a massive scale and passing it on. If it is misused, how could this affect us?

The Booker

Year
2011
Duration
96 minutes
Location
United States of America

Steve Scarborough is a booker with a vision who is struggling to build a professional wrestling league from the ground up. In Steve's mind, modern pro wrestling has lost their audience because the theatrical form has been spurned in favor of shock tactics and clearly fake fighting. Putting everything he has on the line, Steve works to capture and engage audiences by restoring integrity to championship wrestling with PWC and along the way he learns a little something about himself.

Steve Scarborough, thirty eight year old father of two, has loved pro wrestling since he was a small child growing up in Hawaii. So much so, at 22 he went to Japan to train as a wrestler, seeing it as a good way to get the experience he needed to pursue his dream of being a pro wrestling, Pro wrestling in Japan is treated much different than here in America. The wrestlers are respected and expected to act as professional athletes. The training is a brutal, boot camp like routine made to weed out any applicant that is seen as wanting by the elder wrestlers. When he returned to the states, he hooked up with the legendary Jake “The Snake” Roberts and would be his traveling companion/wrestling opponent for almost 2 years. Steve maintains that it was these two experiences that have shaped his opinion of what pro wrestling should be.

Gradually Steve learned that he wouldn't be able to make a decent living as a wrestler alone, so he started doing commentary and live announcing of the matches where he was on the under card. Things may have continued thus, traveling the country, picking up matches when and where he could until a chance meeting with pro wrestling legend 'Rowdy' Roddy Piper. Piper encouraged him to go into teaching the sport, saying that Steve was “too smart to get his head bashed in for money”.

Knowing that pro wrestling's deepest roots lay in the south, Steve decided that was where he should go to set up his school. That was it, he just picked Atlanta off a map, packed up and moved. That was 2001.

After a few soured partnerships and failed attempts to get a school off the ground, Steve had all but given up on having a wrestling school of his own. Now married with children, he had to consider that being a wrestling coach and booker might not be in the cards. He decided to give it one last go, having heard that a local theater might let him set up a ring in a spare room.

The Burning Season

Year
2009
Duration
89 minutes
Location
Indonesia

Dorjee Sun, a young Australian Entrepreneur, believes there's money to be made from protecting rainforests in Indonesia, saving the orangutan from extinction and making a real impact on climate change.

Armed with a laptop and a backpack, he sets out across the globe to find investors in his carbon trading scheme.

It is a battle against time. Achmadi, the palm oil farmer is ready to set fire to his land to plant more palm oil, and Lone's orangutan centre has reached crisis point with over 600 orangutans rescued from the fires.

The Interconnected World

Year
2011
Duration
44 minutes
Location
China,Ghana,United Kingdom,Poland

The four videos discuss how the world economic order is being shaped by the global crisis, the rise of Asia and the implications for the rest of the world, how the discovery of oil is affecting a low-income country in Africa, and the transition of a country in Eastern Europe from communism to a market economy and membership of the European Union.

The IMF was established to foster economic stability and promote peace following the devastation of World War II. This global financial institution has been undergoing rapid change to meet the challenges of the 21st century, and played a vital role in helping countries deal with the international crisis.

The Kids Britain Doesn't Want

Year
2010
Duration
48 minutes
Location
United Kingdom

Every year, thousands of children come from all over the world to Britain seeking refuge from persecution, terrorism and war. But many arrive to find this country is not the place of safety that they hoped. Instead they are met by a culture of disbelief and an asylum system that in some cases causes them profound psychological and physical harm.

Through the stories of a 10-year-old Iranian boy, a 16-year-old Afghan and a 22-year-old Ugandan woman this revealing film explores the experiences of young people who have been brutalized by the British asylum system. This is the story of the kids Britain doesn't want.

The Man Who Stole My Mothers Face

Year
2003
Duration
75 minutes
Location
South Africa

Hope Road is a quiet jacaranda-lined street in a white middle-class suburb in Johannesburg, South Africa. Two days before Christmas in 1988, a 59-year-old woman is sexually assaulted and savagely beaten in her home by a young white teenager.

Fourteen years on, the woman has still not recovered from this assault. The police bungled the investigation, the neighbours disputed her version of events and her son blamed her for letting the perpetrator into her house.

The teenager, identified from a school photograph, was never charged and remains a free man. The woman's daughter is film-maker Cathy Henkel, and the film is her search for some form of justice and whatever it takes to help her mother heal and move on from this trauma.

The journey takes her back to Johannesburg, city of her birth, to confront the past and the present climate of violence. The police re-open the case, but they run into numerous obstacles and the film-maker has to take matters into her own hands. What she discovers and the answers she brings back for her mother form the climax of this compelling, and ultimately uplifting.

The Potemkin League

Year
2010
Duration
39 minutes

In 2005 the Glazer family took over Man United in Footballs first leveraged buyout. In 2007 America duo Tom Hicks and George Gillett purchased Liverpool football club in the same manner despite promises to the contrary. The Potemkin league chronicled the unfortunate ownership of the two Americans and found a city and culture that was diametrically opposed to their methods. The documentary discovers the Shankly spirit, crushed by the Thatcher years, awakened in the city and followed the events as they unfold. Director: Michael Oswald; Writer: Mike Horwath; Stars: David Bick, Patrick Duggan and Tony Evans

The Way Up

Year
2009
Duration
52 minutes
Location
Israel

During Ceausescu regime’s rule in Romania abortions had been illegal. As a result, Romenian orphanages became full as many mothers were unable to keep their children. This is where Lian grew up until the age of four. An Israeli couple chose to adopt Lian - a beautiful girl with huge but sad eyes - amongst many of the other abandoned children. Shortly after, it became clear that the home she had been brought to was abusive, and at the age of 14 she ran away and found herself living in the streets.

The Way Up is the personal story of a street girl’s struggle for survival, led by her dream of reuniting with her birth mother. Alone in this world, she teaches herself to deal with harsh realities as she searches for ways to alleviate her loneliness. The film follows Lian for three years and reveals the cruel and tough reality of street life in Tel Aviv.

Tracked Down: Investigating Digital Arms Dealers

Year
2012
Duration
60 minutes

Imagine a world where the government can read every email sent and listen to every phone call made. An entire country under constant surveillance. Actually you don’t need to imagine, because it’s already a reality. Governments around the world are using the most advanced electronic warfare equipment to monitor their citizens’ every move. The equipment, designed for the fight against terrorism, has found its way into the hands of repressive dictatorial regimes in Libya, Syria and Bahrain. Brutal security forces in these countries use the technology to track down protestors and bloggers, who are swiftly arrested and tortured.
This investigation looks into how these rogue states are buying this equipment through deals with French companies and high ranking members of the Sarkozy government. These business deals are technically legal but surely the companies and the French government have a moral responsibility? Were they aware that the material was to be used against citizens and political opponents in this way? Or did they just not care? We investigate in Libya and Syria and talk to those who arranged the deals. They claim there is a complex political and economic context. But is what they really mean that they value increasing profits over democracy, freedom or human rights?

Uranium - Is It a Country?

Year
2009
Duration
53 minutes
Location
Germany,France,Australia

This documentary visits Australia to explore the mining, processing and environmental effects of uranium. It answers questions like; "Where does uranium go?" and, "What is left behind after uranium is mined?". An interesting look at the direct environmental and social cost of nuclear power, as uranium must come from somewhere.

Wadim

Year
2010
Duration
90 minutes
Location
Germany

Wadim K. grew up in Germany. He spoke German, had German friends, and even felt German. But Wadim never received a German passport, because he arrived in Hamburg together with his family as a refugee. 13 years later the public authorities seek to deport the family. This night-time assignment ends disastrously with Wadim’s mother cutting her wrists and his father detained. Wadim is 18 years old and finds himself being deported to Latvia – a country he can hardly remember. He spends the next five years fighting for a new existence. During his final, illegal visit to Hamburg, in January 2010, Wadim throws himself in front of a train. He is 23 years old. The 90-minute film, WADIM, pieces together the mosaic of a short life, representative of the lives led by 87,000 other people with only a provisional status to stay, their existence merely tolerated in Germany. Through photos and very personal family videos as well as interviews with Wadim’s parents, friends, his first love and other contemporary witnesses, viewers put together their own idea of how the family fell apart, how the boy changes from a happy child, who goes to school and plays bassoon, to a character driven away from his home to end up in a Latvian shelter for the homeless, no longer able to hold out against his own fears and concerns.
Note: the trailer is in German but the full film has English subtitles.

What a Way to Go: Life at the End of Empire

Year
2007
Duration
123 minutes
Location
United States of America

Tim Bennett, middle-class white guy, started waking up to the global environmental nightmare in the mid-1980s. But life was so busy with raising kids and pursuing the American dream that he never got around to acting on his concerns. Until now…

Bennett journeys from complacency to consciousness in his feature-length documentary, What a Way To Go: Life at the End of Empire. He reviews his Midwestern roots, ruthlessly examines the stories he was raised with, and then details the grim realities humans now face: escalating climate change, resource shortages, degraded ecosystems, an exploding global population and teetering global economies.

Bennett identifies and calls into question the fundamental assumption that has led to this unprecedented crisis in human history: that humans were destined to dominate the rest of the community of life with the Culture of Empire.

He pushes the dialogue where Al Gore did not go.

Powerful interviews with well-known authors including Daniel Quinn, Derrick Jensen and Richard Heinberg, and noted scientists William Schlesinger and Stuart Pimm, fill in some important pieces. Scathing and humorous use of archival footage is balanced with very human snapshot comments from family and friends.

On Walkabout, Bennett ends with an invitation to join him with courage and consciousness on the unexplored shores of a future not yet written.

When the Dust Settles

Year
2010
Duration
35 minutes

When the Dust Settles combines comedy and serious content to explain the dangers of uranium mining, the nuclear fuel cycle and the use of depleted nuclear materials – much of which originates in Australian uranium mines – in weapons production. It is presented on location at the Olympic Dam and Ranger uranium mines and Roxby Downs, by veteran Australian actor, and former electrician, Tony Barry. Academy Award nominee and internationally-respected Australian filmmaker, David Bradbury, of Frontline Films, was director. Other participants include Canadian nun, Dr Rosalie Bertell (who led an international team into Chernobyl), Dr Helen Caldicott (paediatrician and high-profile anti-nuclear campaigner), Dr Peter Karamoskos (nuclear radiologist and specialist in the health effects of radiation, including low level radiation), and a representative of the uranium mining industry. The film is based around a family, the Sparkies – played by Austen Tayshus, Mandy Nolan, Zoe Hutchence and Dylan Bradbury – who consider taking the big money on offer for electricians in the uranium mining industry until their son confronts them with the health and environmental risks.

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